Tag Archives: United States

Getting Germany Back on Track

By Markus Ziener

The Mar­shall Plan has become syn­ony­mous for mas­sive help, for bring­ing about a her­cu­la­neum task and hav­ing a coun­try rise again from the ash­es. Orig­i­nal­ly designed to help Europe get back on track after the dev­as­ta­tions of World War II, it has a much broad­er mean­ing today. In dis­cus­sions about how to rebuild Ukraine at some point in the future, there’s again talk of the need for a Mar­shall Plan. How­ev­er, it’s worth­while to take a step back and look at what the orig­i­nal Mar­shall Plan was all about.

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Teaching Native North America: A Continuing Challenge

By Christoph Strobel

Intel­lec­tu­al lega­cies of col­o­niza­tion play a pow­er­ful role in shap­ing how main­stream U.S. and glob­al soci­ety has come to see Native Amer­i­cans. Art­work from the 19th and 20th cen­turies – such as James Ear­le Fraser’s sculp­ture, “The End of the Trail” – have helped to cre­ate the image of Native Amer­i­cans on horse­back as rep­re­sen­ta­tions most asso­ci­at­ed with Indige­nous pop­u­la­tions of North Amer­i­ca. Type “Native Amer­i­can” into a search engine, and you’ll like­ly get many his­tor­i­cal images of Great Plains Indi­ans. In parts of Europe as well, the per­cep­tion of Native Amer­i­cans has been shaped in unique ways by authors like Karl May and the lat­er movies based on his books. With­out a doubt, our stu­dents’ per­cep­tions about Native Amer­i­cans are influ­enced by these fan­tasies and representations.

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Chicana/o Quiz

By Maria Moss

 

In order to cel­e­brate Cin­co de Mayo, the – unfor­tu­nate­ly not offi­cial – hol­i­day of Mex­i­can Amer­i­cans in the Unit­ed States, I’d like you to do the quiz and see how much you know about “la cul­tura chicana.”

Down­load the quiz and don’t look at the answers yet!

In a trying political climate, look not towards what divides, but what unites Germany and the U.S.: Journalistic Excellence

By Mattheus Wee

Are Ger­man-Amer­i­can rela­tions in a crit­i­cal state? If pub­lic opin­ion sur­veys are any­thing to go by, per­haps so – at least accord­ing to Ger­mans. While Amer­i­cans gen­er­al­ly still hold on to a pos­i­tive image of Ger­many, the same can­not be said for the way most Ger­mans view the Unit­ed States. A joint­ly con­duct­ed poll by the Pew Research Cen­ter and the Kör­ber-Stiftung revealed late last year that while “three-quar­ters of Amer­i­cans see rela­tions with Ger­many as good,” near­ly “two-thirds of Ger­mans (64%) see rela­tions as bad.” More alarm­ing­ly, the New York Mag­a­zine quotes a sur­vey con­duct­ed by YouGov reveal­ing that Ger­mans view Pres­i­dent Trump as “a greater threat to world peace than any oth­er head of state” – a note­wor­thy dis­tinc­tion, espe­cial­ly in light of the exis­tence of oth­er con­tro­ver­sial lead­ers, such as the likes of Kim Jong Un and Vladimir Putin.

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How well do you know the United States and Canada? A Quiz

By Maria Moss

“Cana­da Border-R12-074–35A” by melissambwilkins

Now that the nation­al hol­i­days of both Cana­da (July 1) and the Unit­ed States (July 4) are upon us, it’s time to check how well you, our read­ers, know both coun­tries. In my sem­i­nar, “Intro­duc­ing North Amer­i­can Stud­ies,” I’m always pleased with how much my stu­dents know about the States and, at the same time, shocked at how lit­tle they know about Cana­da. Let’s see if you fare better….

Down­load and enjoy the quiz  – and don’t look at the answers yet!

 

How Do Americans Really Talk?

By Grant Helle

We know that not all Amer­i­can Eng­lish is the same: South­ern­ers love to talk about sip­ping ‘coke’ while drink­ing a sprite; New York­ers talk about their pie while eat­ing at a pizze­ria; and Bosto­ni­ans love talk­ing about plen­ty, but no one has under­stood them since the 1800s.

Sure­ly these are the only three dialects in Amer­i­ca, right?
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Not quite.

Even though these dialects might not be as dis­tinct as those of the British Isles, Amer­i­can Eng­lish still has plen­ty of dif­fer­ences that are – as with almost every lan­guage – increas­ing. In fact, these vari­a­tions are not always notice­able right away. An Iowan might not real­ize that news­cast­ers are from some­where else until they keep refer­ring to ‘law-yers’ and not ‘loy-yers’.

So how do Amer­i­cans real­ly talk? In 2002, Pro­fes­sors Bert Vaux and Scott Gold­er set out to answer this ques­tion and devel­oped a sur­vey of over 120 ques­tions in order to deter­mine who pro­nounces what, how, and where.

But why just read about it? Take The New York Times’ dialect chal­lenge yourself.